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Position Statements

The following Palliative Care Australia Position Statements have been endorsed by the State Council of Palliative Care Queensland.

Ensuring quality and safety of end-of-life care

Services provided to people at the end of life have been developed according to a wide range of funding, governance, organisational and operational models. The impact of these diverse approaches to service and health care delivery on patient experience and outcomes are not well known or understood.
Ensuring quality and safety of end-of-life care - position statement

Advance care planning

Advance care planning is a process to help people formulate and communicate their preferences regarding care during future incapacity. Advance care planning gives the person the opportunity to determine the likely scenarios coming towards the end of their life, including the treatment they receive and the way they would like to be cared for.
Advance care planning - position statement

Carers and end of life

There are close to 2.6 million carers and nearly 500,000 primary carers in Australia, providing close to 1.2 billion hours of care annually. Estimates suggest carers provide 76% of all services to people needing care and support.
Carers and end of life - position statement

Primary health care and end of life

The capacity of the health system to provide access to quality care at the end of life for all who may require it is questionable. As the Australian population continues to age and an increasing number of Australians live out the final stages of their lives with chronic, complex conditions, both the total population and the proportion of the Australian population requiring end of life care annually, is expected to increase. The role of primary health care providers and services is vital in providing quality care at the end of life.
Primary health care and end of life - position statement

Residential aged care and end of life

The significance of our ageing population to aged care, and to the demand on such services for the end-of-life, is substantial and will increase with the expected rise in the proportion of the population aged over 65 years. Residential aged care facilities are increasingly the place of death for people with terminal conditions, unless residents are transferred to acute care facilities.
Residential aged care and end of life - position statement

Voluntary euthanasia and physician assisted suicide

Euthanasia is not a part of palliative care practice. Informed discussion about voluntary euthanasia is hindered by our failure as a society to guarantee access to quality care at the end of life in which people's rights to articulate the terms of their care are respected. It is also hindered by limited community capacity to engage in frank and open discussion about dying and death.
Voluntary euthanasia and physician assisted suicide - position statement

Palliative care and culturally and linguistically diverse communities

Palliative Care Australia believes quality care at the end of life is realised when it is individualised to meet the person's needs and upholds their preferences which are based on many factors, including individual cultural beliefs.
Palliative care and culturally and linguistically diverse communities - position statement

Improving access to quality care at the end of life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

Quality care at the end of life is realised then it is culturally appropriate to the particular needs of individuals and groups that includes families, kinships, and tribes.
Improving access to quality care at the end of life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

Workforce for quality care at the end of life

The profile, skills and capabilities of the Australian health workforce is being shaped by changing patterns of disease, increasing demands for quality care at the end of life, system-wide shortages of health professionals, and reforms to systems of care.
Workforce for quality care at the end of life - position statement